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  • It was such a treat to be featured in and on the cover of In Her Studio magazine! 


    It was such a treat to be featured in and on the cover of In Her Studio magazine! 

    In Her Studio Summer 2022 Edition

     

    Ever an Other, as it goes.

    “From up here on the hill, it is easy to imagine I am somewhere other. I can travel backward and forward in time. I am not in suburbia. I am watching the barn being built – no, rebuilt – 200 years later. I am watching myself and my family, in the warm glow in the barn windows at night, pouring our experiences onto a page, a canvas. Another, other. Up here, I can clip and mow and sweat, and when I do, thoughts sprout and wither in abundance. I mowed some down as I removed the unwanted barberry, wisteria, and multiflora rose. I’ve hauled some away with bottles and dolls’ heads and plastic flower arrangements still tied in polyester strips from the ’50s and ’60s that have reigned for much too long in this woodland. But up here, my shoulders and my back have stretched and strengthened, and I’ve built towers of words and collected piles of ideas and have squirreled them away somewhere. The moving does me good. Up here, in our tiny wilderness, both I and the land are transformed. The place where I gather inspiration is just as important as the place where I sit down and turn the gatherings into something other.” 

    Curious, and always with my rump toward the sky, I gather colour, and other treasures from the earth and transform it into gritty and delicious watercolour paints! 

    I always love finding antique treasures for my art supplies in my studio. 

    A view from the woodland, also, my favourite family portrait in the creek – though we are in need of a new one. Søren now stands above Walter and me!
    This was my studio briefly. We are currenly in the process of transforming it into a showroom/gallery space! Read about our Barn Renovation process, here!

    Press: In Her Studio Magazine Features Peg and Awl

    It was such a treat to be featured in and on the cover of In Her Studio maga...

    Read The Post
  • I love the excitement of a new beginning – of whittling down endless possibilities and choosing one project that I will embark on for one hundred days. I love knowing that not every day will produce a masterpiece, but by the end, the collection of days will add up to more than where I began.

    waxed canvas sendak artist roll with paintbrushes and other art supplies

    waxed canvas sendak artist roll with paintbrushes and other art supplies


    The 100 Day Project begins on February 22, This Year (2023)!

    #100DayProject

    “Little by little, a little becomes a lot.”
    –Tanzanian Proverb

     

    “I trusted its unknowing...”
    –Ada Limón in conversation with Krista Tippett
    ​(On Being Podcast episode: ‘To Be Made Whole’)

     

    I love the excitement of a new beginning – of whittling down endless possibilities and choosing one project that I will embark on for one hundred days. I love knowing that not every day will produce a masterpiece, but by the end, the collection of days will add up to more than where I began. I know that I will be transported. I know that I will slip out of a comfort zone and that I will know more about a subject that I am curious about than I did at the start.

    One year I was drawing the variety of plants within a mile or two of my home. Another year, I drew one character and explored the space around her. For the last two years, I’ve been enjoying the smudgy otherness of my left hand. This somehow has given me a new confidence, as if that hand is not me, but a being I am nurturing – a not-myself.

    I start somewhere simple – a walk in the woods or making a meal with a new-to-me vegetable – starting with something doable puts me on a path. I make time and space for it – it needn’t be a lot of time, or a lot of space, though it could be. One year I started my drawings on small pieces of paper that I cut to fit inside of an old tin. This led to a daily walk, an abundance of tiny flower paintings, and to our Alternative Sketchbooks!

    The repetition becomes meditation, the process is wondrous. By the end, I may find something revelatory.

    This year, though I am still undecided, I am leaning toward a new medium.

    Where will you begin?

    dip pen and brush on desk with handmade wooden brush holder


    The Projects are Endless!

    How to Spend these 100 Days?

    handmade clay mug, ink holder, paint pans, and plates
    Handmade Paper Sketchbook on desk with paintbrushes, ink, and water
    100 Days of Clay
    100 Days of Any-Handed Sketching
    handmade ink from foraged plants – purple, green, and yellow
    paper cut log cabin with wood pile and chimney
    100 Days of Making Ink from Foraged Plants
    100 Days of Paper Cut Buildings
    This is Søren’s cabin!

    handmade leather journal with filled journal pages

    letter writing for the 100 day project
    ink drawing of our puppy pearl walking next to me
    100 Days of Letter Writing
    A Letter from Katie!
    100 Days of Your Sweetest
    Our Darling Pearly
    handmade writing ink by a rural pen specimen card notebook for exploring and homeschool projects
    I limit my materials...
    The framework can be broad or specific...

    stack of handmade paper sketchbooks on desk with mortar and pestle


    Start Small and Document!
    Shop Our Studio Collection 

    Venture Outside
    The Scout Plein Air Box
    Stay Home
    The Sendak Artist Roll
    handmade botanical decoupage wooden desk caddy
    handmade waxed canvas crossbody bag with leather strap
    Start Organized
    Medium Botanical Desk Caddy
    Let Things Find You
    The Hunter Satchel
    Pack Light
    The Keeper Pouch
    Keep Everything in Sight
    Beatrix Artist Caddy

    The 100 Day Project in a Sketchbook!

    Bookbinding Tutorial: Planning a Journal for the 100 Day Project

    “You can be in a place for years and years and not see somehing, and then when it dawns, all sorts of nuggets of richness start popping up all over the place. You’ve gotten below the obvious.”
    –Andrew Wyeth

     

    handmade sketchbook on desk with writing and drawing supplies

    Some #100DayProjects that I love!

    drawings of three fat cats marching in red, yellow, and orange by yoshiko hada
    hand drawn portrait of person laying on couch by ella beech
    @yoshiko_hada @ellamorella
     

    Everywhere, Astonishments!
    Some Good Things

    We are changing Some Good Things to Everywhere Astonishments, (also the title of a picture book I’ve been working on). I find astonishments daily, and am thrilled to have a place to share some of them.

    hand drawn shells, set of three, by margaux kent

    art exhibit by lydia ricci of couch atop pencil and pretzel scraps
    art exhibit by rebecca szeto of well-worn paint brushes transformed into elegantly painted portraits
    By Lydia Ricci
    Website
    By Rebecca Szeto
    Website

    As always, if you have any questions, you can send us an email!
    We read every message. You can also comment below, but we might not see it.
    –Margaux

    A New Season for Discoveries – The 100 Day Project is Upon Us!

    The 100 Day Project begins on February 22, This Year (2023)! #100DayProjec...

    Read The Post
  • We put together a little video so you can make your own book for the #100dayproject! Enjoy, ask questions, and share with us on Instagram so we can see your projects too!

    We put together a little video so you can make your own book for the #100dayproject! Enjoy, ask questions, and share with us on Instagram so we can see your projects too!

    #qbbc100days
    #quarantinebookbindingproject
    #pegandawlbinds

    Please note: this tutorial is specifically about page count. Click here for the full Bookbinding at Home Tutorial: Stitching a Coverless Journal. 

    In this video, I’m making two books at a time, both specifically made for the 100 day project. They are both the same size with just a few variations. I find this project to be a really nice reason to get out and observe the world.

    These are the two journals, highlighting different colors and vintage textiles!
    Here you can see a full journal spread dedicated to one day!

    When youre making a book for a particular project, it’s really important to consider both paper size and page count of your book. I’m making this book for my 100 day project, so I’m going to consider how many pages I will need for the 100 days. Usually, I like to dedicate a full spread to one day, so I’m going to need double the pages, though in some instances, I’ll use one page per day.

    Journal Page Planning


    100 Day Project Planning Table


    If your 100 day project will consist of one spread per day, then you will need 52 sheets, which is the size of one full page spread open. Once you fold a single sheet in half, it’s called a folio. You'll be putting 4 folios inside of each other and that will make up one signature. You will have a total of 13 signatures. That will give you 202 pages, not counting the front and back cover. The few extra pages can come in handy for notes or whatever you may want to add.

    If you want to make a book that is dedicating one page to a day, then you will need 27 sheets. You’ll be putting 3 folios inside of each other, and that will make up one signature. You will have a total of 9 signatures. And this will give you 106 pages not counting the front and back cover.

    Bookbinding Glossary
    Sheet: The unfolded paper pages that you start your project with
    Folio: A folded sheet
    Signature: Gathering of folios
    Leaf: One half of a folded sheet
    Page: Each side of each leaf

    Now that I’ve finished folding and tearing my signatures, I’m going to measure out where I want the textiles to be sewn onto the spine of the book. I’m going to start with my quarter inch ends – this is for the end knots. 

    The end knots form lines along the ends. 
    Measuring and marking my linen and thread layout on one signature.
    Then, marking another signature and putting one in front and one in back of the stack.

    Usually, I would now put these signatures into a clamp, and use a ruler to connect the front and back markings in a straight line. However, if you don't have a clamp, these double-sided marks will help. In the video, you can see how I use a jeweler saw to make the holes, instead of poking them one at a time (once again, for full instructions: Bookbinding Tutorial - How to Sew a Coverless Journal).

    Now I am just going to cut some of this wonderful vintage textile that I found in an abandoned house. 

    I am making the strips an inch wide so they can really show off the pattern. 
    A lot of you have been asking what kind of thread I am using; this is a 3 ply waxed Irish Linen thread.

    I have 13 of these signatures, and I’m going to measure 13 lengths of wax thread, slightly larger than the length of the spine. I don’t want a lot of extra thread, because the longer your thread is, especially for a big book like this, the more tangled it’s going to get while you’re sewing. Also, if you cut your thread too short so that you have less to manage, you’re going to have to knot it somewhere in your book, which is not a big deal (but I don't like doing it).

    This feedsack textile was in a bundle that I found in my favorite abandoned house that belonged to Flossie and Jack.
    Step-by-step sewing instructions!

    I have been incorporating antique materials of all kinds into the work that I do for most of my life. I love the stories that they hold, the character, and the quality of these old things. This fascination is what started me off on incorporating textiles into my journals. 

    My friend and I found all of Flossie’s dresses in the attic of her abandoned house; we washed them and wore them for years. We saw all the evidence of the patching and the stitching as these were likely from the depression era. 

    This red feedsack was originally stitched together to make a bag for grain, and then people would use the patterns and the normal cotton feedstock textiles to make clothes; so this was most likely the negative space from the pattern that was cut, and then they used a piece to tie the entire bundle together.

    I am using this delightful leftover for my journal. 

    Just one stack of many vintage textiles we’ve used in our projects.
    Can you spot the vintage touches in these past sketchbooks?

    I’ve participated in this challenge for the last few years, as it encourages me to make marks daily. Some of the drawings in these sketchbooks took 5 minutes, others took hours. It doesn’t matter how long I spend with each drawing, just that I sat down to make some marks.

    In 2021 I used Noodlers Black Ink (with the catfish on the front) and my left (non-dominant) hand for my 100 Day Project. I loved it so much that I've done it for nearly 300 days out of the year - that is three #100dayproject notebooks and a rather newly-skilled left hand!

    A finished project.
    At my desk, with my Sendak Mini and Beatrix Caddies.
    I've been sharing my drawings on my art/family account on Instagram @thebrotherskent.
    I also write with my left hand. It was such a different experience from my meandering Morning Pages!

    Planning a Journal for the 100 Day Project

    We put together a little video so you can make your own book for the #100dayp...

    Read The Post
  • This Of a Kind launch was meant for last year, in Winter, but we got tangled in the decision we shared in our last newsletter (if you missed it, you can read here!) And so here we are, ending winter with an abundance of scrumptious old blacks and blues!

    Excitingly, in the time between meant-to and are, we’ve added some fun extras, including gorgeous Handmade Ink by A Rural PenTintype Journals, and Alternative Sketchbook Tins!

    Each new Of a Kind collection allows us to dig around and find treasures within treasures. Every discovery holds a bit of the past, and the story and marks accumulated. They are a joy to put together and harken back to the best part of our origin story – the gathering of old things and the reimagining and reworking of them into once again useful objects.

    We have a handful of One of a Kind Custom* Pouch Sizes – this one is made with an 1800s Quilt Block! 
    We have a selection of Hand-Bound Tintype Journals in this collection – read more below!

    *Custom Pouch Size: We have 7 pouch sizes in our Peg and Awl catalog, but when we find a quilt block or scrap that is perfect as is, we make the pouch match its size!


    Our Wintery 2023 Of a Kind Collection!

    This Of a Kind launch was meant for last year, in Winter, but we got tangled in the decision we shared in our last newsletter (if you missed it, you can read here!) And so here we are, ending winter with an abundance of scrumptious old blacks and blues!

    Excitingly, in the time between meant-to and are, we’ve added some fun extras, including gorgeous Handmade Ink by A Rural Pen, Tintype Journals, and Alternative Sketchbook Tins!

    Have a wander through our collection of bags and pouches made with homespun linen, quilt blocks, prints from the 1800s, feedsacks, and 1930s dressmakers cotton, along with some of our favourite scraps of scraps, with which we made a variety of littles. Some of the bags are made with our classic waxed canvas colours, and others with our Autumn colours — so many hoorahs!

    Here we are, ending winter with an abundance of wintry blues when all I feel is colour!

    A Rural Pen Handmade Ink!
    View in our Shop

    This ink is handmade, bottled, labeled, and waxed by alchemist Thos. Little of A Rural Pen. I was so enamored with the ink, and when I learned I couldn’t purchase a bottle directly, I decided to order some for all of us! The ink is made using a historic formula of extracting and dissolving the iron from guns with Sumac, instead of Galls. The ink goes on as a pale, smoky, cool grey, and quickly oxidizes on the page; the shade and depth varies depending on the paper used.

    This ink is for dip pens only – it cannot be used in fountain pens.

    Note: The ink is hand bottled, labeled, and waxed. Some bottles have a little leakage through the wax. When you use the ink, it will also get on the label so please accept this possibility, as we do not consider it a defect.

    Handmade Ink by A Rural Pen
    Playing with the ink for the first time!
    Testing this magical ink – drawing paper (Left) and watercolor paper (Right)!
    Inky left-handed Witch Hazel – watch my drawing video, here!

      

    Crossbody Bags made with Vintage Textiles!
    V
    iew in Our Shop 

    Standard Tote with Feedsack: Wylie
    Mini Tote with 1800s Homespun: Edward
    Small Hunter with 1800s Quilt Block: Astrid
    Heavy homespun linen blanket transformed into a Hunter Satchel lined with Truffle.
    I found two full bolts of this textile from the 1800s long ago. The width was 36" which was the width of the looms then. I've been savouring it, and we may have some small bits for bookbinding linens, but mostly, this is its last hoorah!
    Hunter Satchels are my favourite hiking and flea market bag — carry only what you need!

    Pouches made with Vintage Textiles!
    V
    iew in Our Shop

    We’ve been finding so many gorgeous textiles at Flea Markets lately and have to tame the scale of each collection. We’ve transformed the gathering of patchwork and scrap into useful pouches, giving them new life.

    These pouches are perfect for art supplies, make-up, and anything else that needs organizing in your bag or on your desk — they’re hard to be without and you can never have too many!

    This feedsack was washed again and again until its printing faded to just a subtle reminder of days past. 

    Custom Pouch with 1800s Quilt Block: Mackenzie
    Essentials Pouch with 1800s Dressmaker’s Fabric: Dolly
    We reserved some Elderberry before it sold out for this collection!
    Scribbler Pouch with 1800s Antique Cotton: Sinclair
    Keeper Pouch with 1930s Dressmaker’s Fabric: Delia
    Spender Pouch with Early 1900s Scrap Bundle: William
    Hand Stitched Custom Quilt Block – perfect for small things, fits inside our bags’ pockets!
    Saver Pouch with Early 1900s Scrap Bundle: Joanna

     

    Edgeworth Tin: Alternative Sketchbook!
    View in Our Shop

    We have 6 blue tins in stock – they are nearly 100 years old and have varying degrees of rust and marks of past lives. Each tin comes with 100 sheets of Strathmore drawing paper in celebration of the upcoming 100 Day Project, which begins on February 22.

    My Non-Dominant Hand 100 Day Project from Last Year

    We don’t have many of these tins, and we are always looking for more, but in the meantime – grab your favourite tin, cut your favourite paper and voila! Here is our short video on cutting your own paper.

     

    Tintype Journals!
    View in Our Shop

    Read More About Tin Types!

    One of a kind tintype journals are back! The cover is black vegetable-tanned leather, and is paired with some of our favourite antique black and white textiles from the 1800s. Beneath oval frames we’ve set enduring portraits of nameless faces newly christened. The insides, as always, are made of hand-stitched Strathmore drawing paper and work wonderfully with a variety of drawing and writing materials.

    Standard Tintype Journal: Noam
    Standard Tintype Journal: Gertrude
    Companion Tintype Journal: Shirley + Jasper
    Companion Tintype Journal: Ethel + Timmy


    The Secret to a Good Flea (Market) Day is a Good Friend! 

    Read the story that celebrates the discovery of some of the treasures in this collection at a Flea Market in the thick of the summer heat!

    Sneak Peak into our Wintery 2023 Of a Kind Collection

    Each new Of a Kind collection allows us to dig around and find treasures wit...

    Read The Post
  • And here we are, another major transition! We are selling our Philadelphia building and moving Peg and Awl to our barn.

    Peg and Awl Workshop Exterior In Philadelphia

     

    Peg and Awl Workshop Exterior In Philadelphia


    We’re Moving Out of Philadelphia
    ...and it's bittersweet!

    We are very fortunate – as a family and small business owners – to be able to follow our curiosities to wherever they may lead. Here we find ourselves in another major transition! We – Walter and I, Søren and Silas too, have decided to sell the Peg and Awl building in Port Richmond Philadelphia, and move our business into our Barn here in Chester County, Penna. It felt like a quick decision, but it was the culmination of much quiet consideration. I have always been spontaneous – or so it seems – so much is accomplished in our sleep.

    Yesterday was warm and wondrous. As I walked from Port Richmond to Old City for a last minute hair appointment at Barnet Fair, and to treasure hunt at Vagabond Boutique, I felt the weight of nostalgia for what we would soon be leaving, and a lightness too, as I imagined floating, for the first time in a while, into a new unknown.

    Family Portrait in the Mirror in Workshop
    Restored Barn Exterior Through the Trees
    Lights off – we were about to leave on Saturday but paused for a quick mirror family photograph!
    Our barn as seen from the woods!

    Some Things to Look Forward to in the Coming Year!

    We will have a smaller space for to make and to store treasures, which is why we are reducing our catalog to our favourites and yours!

       

      The Foundlings (Peg and Awl) Building: Before and After

      Read about the Shop Renovation Project, here!

      We’ve put a lot of work into our workshop since we bought the dark and closed-up building in 2016 – from opening cinder-blocked windows and tearing down walls, to transforming the gravel and pavement into gardens. We built and set up a storefront (that we never officially opened) just before the pandemic. We poured concrete floors and filled the wide open space with an abundance of tools and machines and worked with our wonderous crew to design, make, and ship all of the treasures that we share around the world.

      We look forward to the next adventure for Peg and Awl and, too, for the building! The dream is always for some magic makers to take the reins and re-imagine a better, brighter, greener, and cleaner corner of Philadelphia.

      A lot happens through word of mouth — if you know someone who may be interested, please share!

      The Listing for Our Building

      After
      Storefront, trees, plants, and windows!
      Before
      A lightless old space full of stuff.
      After
      Employee gardens and honey bees~
      Before
      Concrete slab (though locals told us it was a wading pool in the summers and an ice hockey rink in the winters!)
      After
      A part of the woodshop!
      During
      Pouring the concrete floor.
      During
      Knocking down the in-between wall.
      Before

      Map of Philadelphia Through the Years

      Renovations and the inhabiting of the nearly abandoned building in Port Richmond, Philadelphia.

      Read Here!

       


      The Barn: Our New Shop

      Read On: Our Barn Restoration Project

      We will continue to make treasures in Philadelphia over the next few months. In May, we will be opening our new workspace to the public for a Studio Tour in May! There we will share our art, showroom, and the goings on of the new iteration of Peg and Awl.

      This space will be a gallery and showroom.

      Walter’s cozy loft studio will remain Walter’s cozy loft studio.

       


      Our Barn Restoration Project

      Read On: Our Barn Restoration Project

      “...By the time we had finished removing the rotted bits, the trusses, the rafters, and the floors, it was hard to say if we were reclaiming an old barn, or building a new one in its image. The barn shape – the space within the frame – became one of the few parts I could solidly say remained from the historic place. But over the next few weeks, as I observed the delicate skeleton of the old barn standing strong but precarious in the wind and rain – with day now inside and night inside too – I grew suspicious of this boundaryless thing I wanted to keep. What were we preserving, and more, why?”

      The Old Barn from the road.
      We hired Precise Buildings to rebuild the barn!
      Original wall that divides the two parts of the barn. Pearl and Søren, my loves. 
      A new view!

       

      We’re Moving Out of Philadelphia, and It’s Bittersweet!

      We’re Moving Out of Philadelphia...and it's bittersweet! We are very fortu...

      Read The Post
    • I am often overwhelmed by the stuff around me. I cannot keep it down. I cannot tame it. I want it all to leave but then I go to a flea market and things call out, and there I go, arms outstretched like a somnambulist. But then I play, and things happen. And they aren’t all good but that doesn’t matter. It is the moving, the shuffling, the brightening and widening of spirits and thoughts and ideas that matters.

      Cozy home art studio or office with tea and puppy

       

      Cozy home art studio or office with tea and puppy


      In A Warm Winter

      We haven’t had much winter yet. There are random days when I am outside in a tank top raking old piles of previously ungardened debris as if Autumn is here to stay. Except, beneath the piles I’ve found thousands of eager green bits who tell me otherwise. The most enthusiastic of them are clumps of Snowdrops and Daffodils so abundant that I long for warmer rainy days so I can move them out of paths and thin them out so they can breathe – so they can take up even more space*.

      Now that the mornings are a smidge brighter, I can see the fog that hangs in our little valley in the wee hours, and it lifts my fog-loving spirits. Being awake when the world seems mostly asleep is a gift I receive nearly daily.

      Grey crossbody bag packed with camera and writing supplies
      Man holding grey gender-neutral waxed canvas tote
      Small Batch: The Hunter Satchel in Fog
      Small Batch: The Waxed Canvas Tote in Fog


      On My Desk

      Shop Our Studio Collection!

      I am often overwhelmed by the stuff around me. I cannot keep it down. I cannot tame it. I want it all to leave but then I go to a flea market and things call out, and there I go, arms outstretched like a somnambulist. But then I play, and things happen. And they aren’t all good but that doesn’t matter. It is the moving, the shuffling, the brightening and widening of spirits and thoughts and ideas that matters.

      I shall not be tamed, and neither, I suspect, shall my stuff.

      Mornings are for writing and drawing. And getting inky, inevitably. I love these journals! You can make them with our tutorials as your guide (here) or with our Anselm Bookbinding Kits (here).

      Hard-cover journal Hand-Bound with green vegetable-tanned Leather
      Brush Rest Trio made from Antique American Chestnut.
      Small Carson Tome for morning pages and all manner of thinking on paper.
      non dominant hand drawing exercise for daily journaling
      non dominant hand drawing in homemade notebook
      “What keeps me up at night is wondering where I planted the Iris Cristatas. Where?”
      More drawings @beingmargauxkent
      “In the sun, 40 degrees feels summery. I removed my winter layers and embarked on the unplanting project at the 5 acre wood. Under piles of dead things, living things thrive! Thousands of daffodils anxious for springs’ arrival!”
      waxed canvas roll up pencil case with essential writing and drawing supplies
      Desk organization tools for home studio
      Sendak Mini Artist Roll in Almond

       


      Projects In the Works

      Sign up for our email newsletter to be notified when we announce the launch!

      Solvitur Ambulando Jewelry by peg and awl
      Solvitur Ambulando Jewelry
      We will be joining the County Studio Tour in May!

       


      Some Good Things

      My Winter Studio – Left-Handed Drawings

      In A Warm Winter We haven’t had much winter yet. There are random days whe...

      Read The Post
    • Walter and I started Peg and Awl on the 10th of January, 2010! According to my journal – which was blank – it was just a day like any other day. 

      ​Tin Type by Tyler Scaife 2011/2012. Tyler was one of our first employees and he helped us build the first woodshop (that we are standing in front of) in the backyard of our Philadelphia row home. Søren and Silas are here too, a blur, for the exposure was 45 seconds!

      Our 13th Anniversary!

      Walter and I started Peg and Awl on the 10th of January, 2010! According to my journal – which was blank – it was just a day like any other day. Though I’ve always kept a journal, I didn’t commit daily; a blank page now would absolutely denote a different kind of day! But as I sit, my butt pained by the raised root of this old Norway Spruce overlooking a cemetery on a seriously misplaced spring day, I think about how everyday is just another day, and too, how no days are just another day. It is perplexing, this life. Each day is a day to start something new, or a day to simply be. I am trying both.

      –January 2020

      Thank you for being here!

      Walter and I write every newsletter and blog post, should you wish to reach out to us!

      Though we forgot our anniversary date, we are daily grateful that the things we love to dream up, make, and use are enjoyed by others too – it keeps our creativity, spirits, and business going!

      2023 will see us meandering off of familiar paths into unknown territory. A disruption is in order! Until then...

      Some Things to Look Forward to in the Coming Year!



        Our Workspaces Through the Years!

        The Backyard Shoppe (2010–2012)
        Photograph by Chris Crisman
        The Peg and Awl House
        ​(2010–2019)
        The Atlas Casket Factory (2012–2017)
        Photograph by Parikha Mehta
        The Current Shoppe (2016...)
        This is where our treasures are made!


        The Barn at the Five Acre Wood (2022...)

        Read about the Barn Renovation Project, here!

        I’ve been moving around The 5 Acre Wood looking for spot that is just right! Here I am in my first studio, which will sooon be a gallery space and showroom!

        A view of The Barn from the woodland.

        A portrait of our family when we first moved here – we are due for a new one...

        Walter takes his Scout Plein Air Box everywhere!
        As for me, journals and Sendaks are my constant companions.

         


        Some Good Things


        “A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one.”
        –Robert Greene

        • Podcast: The full quote is so much more exciting than this misunderstood snippet. Have a listen to this episode of Simon Sinek’s A Bit of Optimism – he interviews the TSA head of socal media – Janis Burl. What a thrilling conversation about interruptions and zig zags! 

        The Anniversary of Peg and Awl!

        ​Tin Type by Tyler Scaife 2011/2012. Tyler was one of our first employees an...

        Read The Post
      • How New Years come around so quickly, these new years. 2022 was another weirdo, and we look forward to new and very different adventures, and too, very same adventures in 2023.

        “If you like to write or draw or dance or sing, do it because it’s so great: as long as we’re playing around like that, we don’t feel lonely, and our hearts warm up.”
        –from The Woman Who Killed the Fish by Clarice Lispector 

        Walking next to Mantis trailer with puppy

        Walking next to Mantis trailer with puppy


        Our Start of Year Travels

        How New Years come around so quickly, these new years. 2022 was another weirdo, and we look forward to new and very different adventures, and too, very same adventures in 2023.

        “If you like to write or draw or dance or sing, do it because it’s so great: as long as we’re playing around like that, we don’t feel lonely, and our hearts warm up.”
        –from The Woman Who Killed the Fish by Clarice Lispector 

        Drawing in Peg and Awl Handmade Bookbinding Kit
        drawing in handmade leather journal
        Søren drawing in his Anselm Sketchbook.
        Walter drawing in his Standard-Sized Harper Journal.


        This morning I awoke in Florida, but I didn’t just arrive here and wake up and wonder, “where am I?” and discover, “oh, Florida!” No, we’ve been driving for days because cars are on roads with limits and not in the sky making endless paths, swarming around like insects or birds. On a road that should take us from Point A to Point B in 4 hours, took 8 or 12. But we’ve been listening to Tom Hanks read The Dutch House by Ann Patchett – time is suspended and none of us are disgruntled, but we stop the car and stretch and walk and that helps time confuse us all the more.

        This morning I crawled out of our camper and into the damp and still dark of Florida. In the morning darkness, which is lighter than nighttime darkness, I spied Spanish Moss above, dripping excess moisture onto me, and welcoming me to this new, strange place. What better way to go into the new year than this? My family sleeping a few feet away, new plants’ hellos. “Hello plants!” I am grateful for this exploration, and for this world of weirdness that is the same, but different, always, and always.

        an open messenger bag with clothes, handmade pouch, and leather journal
        our mantis trailer and picnic table in our campsite
        Autumn Colors: The Keeper Pouch
        One of our campsites!
        Wooden Serving Tray for my on-the-go studio, with journal and books
        Hiking in Florida with Family and Puppy
        The Watson Serving Tray
        Myakka River State Park

        My Finch Satchel filled with art supplies!
        Handmade sketchbook with drawing of person hiking
        Fort Clinch, Florida
        6” Anselm Bookbinding Kit
        Art supplies inside sendak mini artist roll in the almond color

        The Sendak Mini Artist Roll
        brown waxed canvas pouch filled with art supplies and antique tin
        Art Supplies and organization tools for traveling
        The Maker Pouch
        Our On-the-Go Collection

        O’Leno State Park, Florida
        journal page filled with writing
        Søren wearing a small hunter satchel while walking in the forest
        Hand-Bound Leather Tome
        Autumn Colors: The Small Hunter Satchel

          


        Last Chance Classics!

        There is a lot leaving our shop, we know! In an attempt to alleviate the confusion, we've marked listings with Last Chance. Whilst some of the options are sold out, our drop down menus show what still have in stock and ready to ship!

        The Marlowe Lunchbag
        Apothecary Caddy
        Desk Caddy with Quote
        Large Waxed Canvas Tote

          


        Reminder: Some Colors are Leaving

        We still have some almond bags in stock and ready to ship, along with the two other discontinued colours, Radish and Rook!


        The Small Hunter Satchel 
        The Rogue Backpack
        The Gatherer Bag 
        The Reader

        A New Year with New Adventures (2023)

        Our Start of Year Travels How New Years come around so quickly, these ne...

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      • We’ve watched all of the YouTube reviews of our Sendak Artist Roll (thank you!) and have made our own video to answer some questions and share our experience!

        We are grateful for all the wonderful Sendak reviews, and for sharing videos and spreading the word!

        The Sendak Artist Roll Video | Peg and Awl

        We’ve watched all of the YouTube reviews of our Sendak Artist Roll (thank you!) and have made our own video to answer some questions and share our experience!

        We are grateful for all the wonderful Sendak reviews, and for sharing videos and spreading the word!

        Video Transcript

        Hello, everyone! I wanted to give you a little walkthrough of our Sendak Artist Roll. I've been seeing a lot of other people's video walkthroughs and it's been inspiring me to do the same.

        Introduction

        Here is my very well-loved and very well-used Sendak. This is the first "right one" that we made. We went through a lot of trial and error to get to this, so I want to show you what it has the potential to hold.


        Supplies in my Sendak: Scissors and Glue (0:30)

        I always have glue with me because I do a lot of messy collage work, so I love to glue things and I also have scissors for that same reason. I use small scissors if I'm traveling anywhere where I'm getting on a plane, and I use big scissors if I'm just traveling in a car. Both sizes fit into the Sendak nicely. I tend to put the big scissors on an end, in one of the smaller pockets. The smaller scissors fit anywhere, it just depends what else I have in my Sendak.

        The Pencil Pockets (0:55)

        One of the most common requests that we get and one of the things that people tend to comment on is that these pencil pockets are too small for fountain pens. While that's true of this Kaweco cap (the bottom fits, the top doesn't), this vintage technical pen is pretty chunky, and I put it in there all the time. I carry two or three. You can see how it kind of draws the Sendak together, so ultimately there's going to be a little bit less room in other pockets. It's making other things more tight, but really, it's fine.

        When the Sendak is new, the waxed canvas might be tight to even just fit a pencil, but as you use it, it breaks in and loosens up, and then it doesn't loosen any further – that's where it's going to stay. Once you use it more, you can easily fit two standard pencils or paintbrushes into each slot, so it's really not a too small slot once you break it in. 

        Art Studio Desk with journals and drawing supplies and sendak artist roll filled with pens, pencils, and paint brushes


        Supplies in my Sendak: Pencils (1:35)

        I love these beginners pencils that have really soft lead. I love making marks that are a little less particular than, for example, when I'm using my mechanical pencils (which I also love).

        So, these are some of the supplies that I carry every day. I think where the variation comes in, is in which pencils I want, which softness levels, or if I want a water soluble pencil. I'll put the pencils together in this end pocket. It's important to note that the Blackwing fits in. This Blackwing pencil was sharpened once and it makes it a perfect fit. This one was never sharpened, and the eraser is worn down a bit, so it's just above that folding point (the Sendak measures 7.75″ tall at the folding point). The taller one will obviously still work, but I know these are awesome pencils that a lot of people have, so I wanted to show you that.

        Supplies in my Sendak: Pens (2:15)

        Another thing that I carry are dippy pens. I will put pen nibs into a tin. I love using antique tins to store pen nibs, and in this case, a kneaded eraser. These tins are great for little art supplies, and I just put them into the zipper pocket.

        The Zipper Pocket (2:30)

        In addition to the vintage tin, I put another regular eraser. When pencils get too small for the pencil pockets, then I'll put them in the zipper pocket. I also have some extra lead for my mechanical pencils, a pencil sharpener, and I often have a whitewash in there as well. You can fit a lot in this zipper pocket.

        I like to not overstuff my Sendak so that it folds nicely. I really like it to fold up rather than to roll up, which happens when it is very stuffed.

        The Interior Pockets (2:55)

        We have 16 pen and pencil slots in the front, and then we have four pockets behind those. So these four are varying widths – you could see the width of the smaller ones that I use for scissors or pencils, which measure 2.5″ wide. The larger two measure 4.25″ wide. I use these two bigger pockets for sketchbooks.

        We make these Landscape Orra Sketchbooks in our shop. We designed them to fit into both this Sendak and the Mini Sendak. They can also serve as a tool protector if you need it, for example, if I was putting in a dippy pen whose nib needed protecting, or paint brushes, that would be a great tool protector. We also sell acrylic tool protectors separately if you don't want to carry a Sketchbook or Painter's Palette.

        The Iris Painter's Palette is another product that we make. It is for squeezing in tube paints, watercolors, or in this case, making your own paint and filling up these wells with homemade paint. This was made to fit in both the Classic Sendak and the Mini Sendak as well, in these large interior pockets.

        I'm going to put my palette here, and these pens in the back here with some small scissors. I want to have another paint brush and then whatever colors I want to bring. Sometimes I get really organized and other times I just put stuff in. You don't have to be crazy overthinking this. It's just really supposed to hold what you need – what you need for the day, what you need for a week, what you need for a trip.

        I also often have a bookbinding needle held in the top flap here, and I'll put some bookbinding thread here in the zipper pocket, in case I want to make a book. I'll also prepare by having folded paper here in these exterior pockets.

        The Exterior Pockets (4:30)

        These two outside pockets otherwise are great for random sized sketchbooks like this – this would have been one of those random ones that I made. I also love this tin. It's for 15 neocolors, but I've had it for years and I move pastels or other more delicate stuff into here that I don't want to crumble in the pen pockets. It's a really nice fit for these back pockets.

        Exterior pockets on the Sendak Artist Roll, with thin sketchbook and tin reused for pastels

        This is our Orra Portrait Sketchbook, which we made to fit into the Classic Sendak. We have three sizes of these sketchbooks – the Portrait, the Large Portrait, and the Landscape.

        Closing the Sendak (5:00)

        So when I fold up the Sendak – this one is pretty full with everything that I just stuffed into the outside pockets – but when I fold it up, I will hold everything down and pull down this top flap so that it folds nicely. Then I roll in the sides, starting with the zipper pocket, so that all the parts of my Sendak are where they should be. Then I just synch it closed with the leather strap and buckle.

        I'd say this is pretty full – I have stuff in every pocket. In some instances, I have more than one thing in a pocket. There's still a lot of room on this leather strap. So that's it! This will fit nicely into my bag, and I've got what I need for a long time.

        The Buckle Closure

        Another question that we've had is about this buckle. This comes from a gun sling from maybe the forties, and it was intended to function exactly as we use it. We found that it just really holds the Sendak together nicely, and of course, we love incorporating old bits wherever we can, into whatever we make.

        So there you have it! My Sendak, lovingly worn in and full of life.

        Mentioned in this video:


        From Our Shop
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        Related Blog Posts:

        The Sendak Artist Roll: A Walkthrough Video

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      • We’ve decided to discontinue a handful of our classics – some of which have been with us from the beginning! These treasures are limited to the quantities currently on our website and ready to ship. If there is anything you’ve been wanting, now is the time to scoop it up!


        “The facts are sonorous but between the facts there’s a whispering. It’s the whispering that astounds me...”
        –Clarice Lispector from The Hour of the Star

        Since the start of our business, we’ve been making objects that change as we change – fast, slow, it is difficult to say. Perspective is mysterious!

        As we reflect on the objects we make and have made, we feel ready for change yet again, ready to make space for new objects reflective of our new experiences and environments.

        We’ve decided to discontinue a handful of our classics – some of which have been with us from the beginning! These treasures are limited to the quantities currently on our website and ready to ship. If there is anything you’ve been wanting, now is the time to scoop it up!

        View our Last Chance treasures, here.

        As always, if you have any questions, send us an email at info@pegandawlbuilt.com

         


        Bags for All Occasions

        Click here for to view all last chance treasures.


        The Gatherer Bag

        The Weekender
        The Large Finch Satchel
        The Large Waxed Canvas Tote
        The Dopp Case
        The Reader

        The Little Rogue Backpack

         


        Home and Kitchen Collection

        Click here for to view all last chance treasures.

        Olde-Fashioned Tree Swing
        Step Stool

        The Bathroom Collection

         


        Studio and Decoupage

        Click here for to view all last chance treasures.


        The Studio Collection

        Chalk Pad
        Large Desk Caddy with Quote
        Apothecary Caddy
        Decoupage Collection

        Last Chance for these Peg and Awl Classics!

        “The facts are sonorous but between the facts there’s a whispering. It’s the...

        Read The Post

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